European Food Safety Agency confirms that neonicotinoid insecticides still pose a grave threat for bees

Tuesday 01 September 2015

suspensions neonicotinoids EFSA

PRESS RELEASE

Photo bee in flower (bee-in-flower.jpg) The European Food Safety Agency (EFSA) recently published its conclusions on the risk of neonicotinoids to bees via applications including spray, stem/soil injection or drip irrigation (seed coatings and granules were excluded)[1].] These are the main uses currently allowed and widely used in agriculture. EFSA clearly judged that neonicotinoids pose high risks for bees, and also noted other risks which could not be excluded. Once again, just as in 2013, EFSA identified a number of industry-data-gaps, which limit EFSA’s ability to complete a full Pesticide Risk Assessment for neonicotinoids and bees.

In 2013, EFSA re-evaluated the Risk Assessment Dossier for neonicotinoids[2],] concluding that these insecticides pose a high risk to bees. At that time, the Agency identified a list of important industry-data-gaps, in the dossier and, until these are remedied, it is impossible to give a full answer on the legal safety requirements, which should apply to these chemicals in relation to honey bee safety.

The present conclusions partially remedy some of the data gaps identified two years ago, like the toxicity when honey bees are exposed to neonicotinoids over several days or the toxicity of neonicotinoids to honey bee larvae.

However, Syngenta (the producer of thiamethoxam) and Bayer (the producer of imidacloprid and clothianidin) failed to provide all of the relevant studies requested by the Commission two years ago; without this information, EFSA cannot complete a full Risk Assessment on neonicotinoids in relation to honey bees.

Francesco Panella, president of Bee Life said: “Everybody knows that neonicotinoids pose a grave danger to bees and pollinators and thereby threaten the very sustainability of our farming system. We knew this in 2013, just as we knew it many years earlier. Yet again, in 2015, EFSA has re-confirmed the danger which neonicotinoids pose for bees. The European Commission and Member States must apply the law and ban all uses of these dangerous bee-poisons.”

EFSA continues to try and fully assess the risks which neonicotinoids pose for bees when these toxins are used as seed coatings or as soil granules.

Bee Life hopes that this time EFSA will overcome all these challenges, in order to complete its vital work on bee and pollinator safety, and to guarantee us a sustainable farming system.

Contact
Bee Life European Beekeeping Coordination

Tel: +32 10 47 16 34

Place Croix du Sud, 4 bte L7.07.09
1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

Notes

[1] [http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/150826

[2] [http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/130116

En 2013, suite à une réévaluation du dossier des néonicotinoïdes, l'EFSA mentionnait les risques élevés de ces molécules pour les abeilles (2). A ce moment, l'Agence avait identifié une liste de données supplémentaires que l’industrie devait fournir. Sans ces données, il est impossible de répondre aux exigences légales requises pour assurer la sécurité des abeilles.

Les conclusions récemment publiées ont remédié à certaines de ces lacunes. C’est notamment le cas pour les données de toxicité chronique (lorsque les abeilles sont exposées à la molécule sur plusieurs jours) et de toxicité larvaire.

Toutefois, il semble que Syngenta (producteur du thiaméthoxam) et Bayer (producteur de l'imidaclopride et de la clothianidine) n'aient pas fourni toutes les études demandées par la Commission, empêchant à nouveau l'EFSA de fournir une évaluation complète des risques des néonicotinoïdes sur les abeilles.

Francesco Panella, président de Bee Life a déclaré: "Nous savons tous que les néonicotinoïdes posent un grave danger pour les abeilles et les pollinisateurs, menaçant ainsi la durabilité de nos systèmes agricoles. Nous en avons eu confirmation en 2013, mais nous le savions bien des années avant; et à nouveau l'EFSA confirme en 2015 le danger que les néonicotinoïdes représentent pour les abeilles. Au vu de ces nouvelles confirmations de toxicité, la Commission européenne et les États membres doivent appliquer la loi et interdire toutes les utilisations de ces produits".

Les risques des néonicotinoïdes pour les abeilles lorsque ces insecticides sont utilisés en enrobage de semences et en granules sont actuellement en cours d’évaluation par l’EFSA.

Bee Life espère que cette fois, l'industrie remettra des dossiers complets à l'EFSA afin qu'elle puisse réaliser un travail complet d’évaluation qui est essentiel pour la sécurité des abeilles et des pollinisateurs ainsi que pour la durabilité de nos systèmes agricoles.

Contact
Bee Life European Beekeeping Coordination
Tel: +32 10 47 16 34
Place Croix du Sud, 4 bte L7.07.09
1348 Louvain-la-Neuve
info@bee-life.eu